Used Backhoe Loaders for sale in Utah

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Overview

Backhoes are the swiss-army knife of the construction site. Backhoes are used mainly for digging, excavation, demolition, and other medium-sized construction projects. The term “backhoe” refers to the action of the digging bucket, which scoops earth backward towards the machine, rather than lifting it with a forward motion like a person with a shovel or bulldozer.

The part of the backhoe arm that is attached to the tractor is called the boom. The section that holds the digger bucket is called the dipper or dipper-stick. Backhoes can be fitted with hydraulic power attachments like hammers, rippers, brooms, and augers, which can be used for tasks like lifting, digging, and breaking up rocky soil.

Frequently Asked Questions

  • Depending on the year, make, and model, used backhoes can cost anywhere from $5,000 to $150,000.

  • Popular brands of backhoes include Caterpillar, Case, John Deere, JCB.

  • Backhoes are commonly used for digging up terrain, excavation, demolition, and medium-sized construction work.

  • The average backhoe weighs around 15,000 lbs with weights ranging from 4,000-25,000 lbs.

  • When entering or exiting your backhoe, always maintain three points of contact. The controls for different backhoe brands are similar, however, always read the owner’s manual. Never operate backhoe without the stabilizers down, exceed the maximum operating weight, or use the bucket weight to lift and carry people.

  • The average lifespan of backhoe components is around 9,000 hours. When looking at used backhoes, consider the work you’ll be doing, the size you’re looking for, and the attachments that will fit your needs.

  • Not all used backhoes are created equally. Check the inspection report to see how the hydraulic system, engine, bucket, loading arms, cab, tires, axles, and boom are operating or if they’ve had any recent maintenance.

  • The average backhoe operator makes $54,210, or $23.55/hour.

  • Operating a backhoe requires fewer qualifications than other heavy equipment; however, it can still pose many hazards and dangers to look out for. If you want to get your foot in the door as an operator, look around until you find a place that’s willing to give you a start or start as a laborer. You can take classes at your local union or train through your company.

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